go from Newbie to near pro in 10 weeks in cyber slalom and T

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John Gilmour
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go from Newbie to near pro in 10 weeks in cyber slalom and T

Post by John Gilmour » Thu Jan 30, 2003 4:49 pm

First dealing with speed.

The best thing you can do is get accustomed to the speed in very small increments. So try going down a hill that has a good runout and even pitch. Travel just 15 feet higher up the hill with each run. When you get to the run out try to initate wobbles on your deck and then damp them out by using your ankles to control the wobble. (make sure you are able to control it 5 times in a row for the same speed- making it once could just be luck)

Only when you can immediately stop a wobble (ie in about less than 2 seconds) should you go another 15 feet up the hill.

Make sure your trucks are as loose as they would be to make a 7.5 foot on center course of straight cones on flat land.
(you won't have to adjust your trucks....after this drill you'll be able to make 6.5 foot on center with your newbie 7.5 foot adjustment)


When you have hit about 25mph and still can control wobbles....now it is time to start running cones.

Place about 15 cones at the bottom of the hill.

Now go up about 40 feet from that.

Coast into the cones. (use 7.5 foot on center to start.)

When you can get clean runs 90% of the time. It is time to add some pump. Pump as fast as you can into the cones from the same height.

Clean them 90% of the time.

Move up the hill another 15 feet. continue until yer hauling ass- always pumping and accelerating.

When you reach about 20-25mph through the cones. reset tighter.

Now go back and set the cones at 7 foot centers. repeat. same process....coasting first...then pumping.

Now do it at 6.5 foot centers (you'll need a ts deck for this one though)

Now you are ready to add offsets. try adding a foot more between the cones and about 6 inches of offset. With no more than 4 offset cones in a row- mix in the tighter straights.

With this "graduated speed and tightness drill" you will progress at the quickest possible rate in terms of feeling confident and in control while increasing your skill level gradually without exposing yourself to injury (Pad up of course- hip pads a good idea). UR13 would be even a better rider if he had followed this drill.

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Post by Matthew Wilson » Thu Jan 30, 2003 5:55 pm

John, what do you mean by "initiate wobbles?"

I have dealt with speed wobbles before and have been able to handle them fine. But maybe the wobbles I have dealt with are not the same kind of wobbles that you are talking about.

Could you elaborate more on this?
Thanks

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Post by Andy Bittner » Thu Jan 30, 2003 7:07 pm

Yeah, I was wondering about that myself. Maybe it's because I'm such an old hand and kill wobbles unconsciously by now, but I wouldn't have the slightest idea how to initiate a true wobble.

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Post by John Gilmour » Thu Jan 30, 2003 9:08 pm

well you do need to stabilize a truck and have accurate ankle control. Going a little quick and then introducing a little "wobbly shimmy" to the trucks ie turn a little left and flick a little right.... that should introduce some wobble to a newbie. You have to learn to ride stable straight before you think about being somewhat controlled and stable while turning at the same speed.

Otherwise speed is intimidating. If you feel unstable you won't feel good about going fast. I would be scared as hell going 130 in a Chevy Chevette- but in an 600SL, it's just another beautiful day.

Guest

Post by Guest » Thu Jan 30, 2003 10:06 pm

John....I feel so honred you pick me out of the masses...hahahaha.

:razz:

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Post by Wesley Tucker » Thu Jan 30, 2003 10:15 pm

I once saw John doing 130 mph in his Mercedes . . . in my rear view mirror! :razz:

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Post by Vlad Popov » Thu Jan 30, 2003 10:25 pm

If anyone else thinks 10 weeks is too long to get there, and the amount of practice/time required to succeed seems too much, I have an alternative offer that might interest you.

EDITED.

Come practice with me, and I guarantee you’ll be what Gilmour promises you….and more… in just 24 hours. Or you money back!

EDITED. HEAVILY EDITED. THE ORIGINAL MEANING IS NOT PRESERVED.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: vlad popov on 2003-05-08 14:17 ]</font>

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Post by Vlad Popov » Thu Jan 30, 2003 10:29 pm

On a serious note, I agree with the “Gilmour Camp” approach. It will all go downhill as soon as you master active slowing down on his and other courses.
Vlad.

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Post by Wesley Tucker » Thu Jan 30, 2003 10:47 pm

I know what you people are thinking, but don't forget Vlad's Russian: he's talking about PAPRIKA!

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Post by Vlad Popov » Thu Jan 30, 2003 10:59 pm

Paprika it is. EDITED. Sorry for the off-topic.
Vlad.


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Vlad Popov on 2003-05-08 14:18 ]</font>

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Post by John Gilmour » Thu Jan 30, 2003 11:50 pm

Wes- if you saw me in the rear view mirror you'd have to be going downhill.:smile:

Seriously- learn to deal with hills and speed- then modify your stance- and learn to deal with courses on hills with speed- and UR there. Just needed to vladiate that point.

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Post by Jeff Goad » Tue Apr 08, 2003 5:34 am

130 mph, herbs, and podiums I’ve been hanging with the wrong crowd how do I get in?

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Post by John Gilmour » Wed Apr 09, 2003 11:56 pm

I did see Jaysey Jay Anderson up at Mt. Tremblant last weekend.

Actually it is time for me to get out there and practice. Anyone want to get a couple of people together in the Boston area for a little slalom?

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: John Gilmour on 2003-09-19 05:33 ]</font>

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Post by Vlad Popov » Thu Apr 10, 2003 12:22 am

EDITED.


Jaysey is the overall 2003 snowboard world champion, or so I heard. He did well in a couple of alpine competitions.

John, how cool would it be if Alberto Tomba stopped by the Swiss race? (I heard a rumor…)
By the way, the Swiss tight promises to be tight. And Italy promises to be represented by …the ItalianS(!).

The technical comps are coming. Sign up for Da Gilmour camp!

Vlad.


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Vlad Popov on 2003-05-08 14:18 ]</font>

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Post by Simon Levene » Thu Apr 10, 2003 3:33 pm

Vlad - How tight will the Swiss tight be, then?

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Post by Chris Eggers » Thu Apr 10, 2003 4:07 pm

Simon, check http://www.pscontest.ch under "Course" for the answer to your question.

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Post by Simon Levene » Thu Apr 10, 2003 4:35 pm

Thanks Chris.

So, not that tight then.

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Post by Vlad Popov » Mon Apr 14, 2003 5:41 pm

Simon, so far I can only recall two 2002 US races that required the use of Cambria type of wheels. Da Farm and New Jersey. The rest were "the real man's races".
I’m looking forward to the Swiss race as the world’s standard technical tight slalom. I just hope they don’t deviate from the promised format under the pressure of the majority (the US way to deal with tight/technical courses).

Vlad.

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Post by Simon Levene » Mon Apr 14, 2003 7:32 pm

Vlad - the Swiss race definitely sounds like Cambria territory, although cut down Avalons may also work.

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Post by Vlad Popov » Mon Apr 14, 2003 7:43 pm

Yep, I use cut 85A Avalons and 92A Abec 11 Flashbacks 95% of the time.

Harder Cambrias are significantly faster on transition than any of the poopy Avi...s and harder Greenies.

I miss "3DM- C-62" races! I so-o-o hope the Swiss one will be it! Well, maybe Andy will surprise us at the GatheringIII with a real technical course. Or two.

And there is Paris, of course, but there is still a big question mark there.

Vlad.

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Post by Eric Groff » Tue Apr 15, 2003 3:17 am

"I just hope they don’t deviate from the promised format under the pressure of the majority (the US way to deal with tight/technical courses)."

Vlad Popoff could you explain this?

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Post by John Gilmour » Fri Sep 19, 2003 12:17 pm

I think what Vlad means is that some races like the race where Team Radikal showed up that was scheduled as a TS and when people saw the pitch of the hill- they voted to make it a Hybrid or GS.

When are we ever going to get a Tight technical TS on a steep pitch in a competition?

Steep and tech tight means you are accellerating quickly and also braking quickly. Its like racing a better car. Or frankly racing on a more advanced race track.

The consensus seems to be that if you have a hill that is no good for GS because it it isn't steep enough....well that's proclaimed a TS hill by default. To me that is just wrong.

I see no reason why a GS hill can not be used for setting a proTechSl as well as a GS. THe less steep hill can then be used for intermediate TS or beginner Hybrid.

Anyhow- to stay on topic- the idea is to improve your skills quickly. Regular practice is important as is having a properly adjusted deck.

You can ride a longwheelbase board to learn how to ride a skateboard. Then try slalom with a shorter deck (30 inches or less)with fewer stance options. This will ensure you dial in a functional stance.

Learn to run high CPS (cones per second) with the short Wheelbase deck. At least the speeds won't be ridiculously high like on a longer deck with wider cones. You have to increase your reflexive speeds. Much like in Martial arts, high speed repetition helps and reinforcing good form and technique are paramount to success.

Then try to increase the technical setting of the course. Such varients you could introduce are.
  1. Variable cone spacing
  2. line leaders
  3. offsets
  4. diagonal offsets
  5. curves
  6. curves to reverse curves
  7. decreasing radius curves
  8. increasing radius curves
  9. curves with unequal spacing
  10. curves with rippers or reverse rippers
  11. variable offset
  12. braking cones
  13. speed chutes
  14. speed chutes into technical sections
  15. criddling options
  16. cones requiring controlled slides
  17. sections requiring a tuck
    etc.
Once you have mastered the basics of each of these things- and I suggest you set courses "particular" to learning each item on the above list....


Then start mixing each ingredient together and you'll notice they combine quite differently. (try for instance a diagonal line leader that goes into a reverse curve with a ripper- good luck! You had better be dialed in really well).

Then after learning the board stability drill (above first post)- start running this stuff on steeper pitches (just like in snowboarding) and you may want to use a longer deck if the hill is really fast- beware though...longer decks can be harder to slow down. You may need to modify your braking cone distances and tech of the course as you increase pitch.

Also practice a variety of knee slides before going to the steeps- just in case. It will also let you ride more relaxed knowing that you can fall and not get hurt- likely reducing or eliminating your chances for falling if you ride sensibly.

Now practice your braking skills on the steep pitches using a varieity of different sized turning arcs at different speeds. Try weighting or deweighting your tail to introduce more traction or begin a slide for braking. (also look for double pumping options right after braking sections to accelerate)

Once you know the slide characteristics of the hill....consider trying different durometers and repeat. Select a wheel with predictable slide characteristics and good roll for the surface. There is alwys an optimum durometer and going too soft or too hard reduces grip.

Now start slowly increasing the speed for the same course - note durometers may change for the traction required ie. more speed in the same course or a more complex course requiring more grip.

Finally- don't set overly complex courses to start as those are pure frustration for the newbie. Instead master each simple course and them start combining each element.

Line leaders first, then offsets. Then variable cone spacing, and last should be decreasing radius curves with rippers (do not do the last ones without great protective gear and hip pads).

Finally- don't skate until you are exhausted unless doing the simplest of courses- or your skills will decrease as you map your neuropathways sloppy when tired.

Best to set a warm up simple course- run a very tech course and then exhaust yourself on a simple course so you can get fit while retaining good form. Running a complex course when tired will just make you more sloppy.

Also- either foot drag or do a series of wide turns to stop. Jumping off will eventually give you
  1. heel spurs
  2. ankle damage
  3. shin splints
  4. knee damage
  5. spinal pain
  6. arthritus
  7. all of the above
Riding in control and within your limits on a good surface with good gear- you can avoid just about ALL injury. Practicing with someone much better than you can lead to falls if youtry to push yourself too quickly (sure you will get better faster...but will you survive until the competition? Besides how many bedsheets would you want to ruin with embedded scabs?)


Just wear out the shoes or your wheels- much cheaper and more fun than physical therapy.

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Post by Brooke Chavez » Tue Sep 23, 2003 10:53 pm

Wow! I'm going to rule the womens class of slalom skateboarding! So much to learn. What a great site.

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Post by Benjamin Felgerolle » Wed Oct 15, 2003 8:42 pm

wow !!!

I've just read the first post of you John !!!

i'm a newbie in slalom, but i'm not really in downhill...But if 40 ou 45 mp/h is my maximum speed on a downhill deck, i just can't even dream about 25 mp/h on a small slalom board with those small trucks, totally loose...

i'm not scared by speed ( i mean not by 25 mp.h ) but a 25 mp/h speed on a slalom board with slalom trucks seems to me as nearly impossible...at least today...

BUT,

Ok, i'm confident ; I'll try your method. Even if i'm sure that the wobble is stronger than me... :o)
fun is not a straight line

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Post by John Gilmour » Thu Jan 15, 2004 4:42 pm

Here is a little course for Newbies to try.
Find a good hill with enough pitch that in about 200 feet you are going about 15-20mph.

Set the first 5 cones at 7 feet on center. Now move over 2 cone widths, add 2 feet more spacing and set 6 more cones 7 foot on center now move back over 2 cone widths, add 2 feet more spacing and set 6 more cones 7 foot on center now move back over 2 cone widths, add 2 feet more spacing and set 6 more cones 7 foot on center now move back over 2 cone widths, add 2 feet more spacing and set 6 more cones 7 foot on center now move back over etc.

You are learning how to deal with step over cones. How to quickly and precisely shift your body over to a new line of cones.

Next reset with centers at 6.5 feet.
One good turn deserves another
john gilmour

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Post by Hans Koraeus » Thu Jan 15, 2004 8:26 pm

You wouldn't possible have a graphic representation of that... ;-)

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Good pumping drill.

Post by John Gilmour » Mon Aug 30, 2004 4:02 pm

No but Wesley Tucker could do it.
Here is a success story-

The skater had ridden kicktail decks for a long time- is in his 40's with a desk job. We set up this course and within a few minutes he was running pretty fast. HE could pump- though not that fast at first and was used to pumping on older kicktail decks. He had a much stronger pump by the end of the 1.5 hour session. Surface was smooth -recently repaved.


Starting from the bottom. I set 12 cones at 8.5 foot on center

Then went to the side about 3 feet and up about 12 feet and set 12 cones at 7.5 feet on center.

Then went to the side about 3 feet and up about 12 feet and set 12 cones at 6.5 feet on center.


So a total of 36 cones- not too many to be tired but enough to get into the rhythm of things. In 12 cones sets the skater must get on his game fast and acellerate quickly before he runs out of cones in that set.

This is done on a moderate pitch hill- fast enough that you could hit 15-20mph if you pushed a bit from the top.


The drill is this.

Have the skater first only do the bottom set of cones. 1st he takes only 3 pushes to enter the 8.5 foot cones and pumps it like crazy (this will help his acelleration pump)
After he starts going pretty fast and topping out- have him move further up the hill and take more pushes into the course. After he can run 8.5 foot fast and clean he will add the next course in the mix.


He starts the 7.5 section with 3 pushes and pumps like crazy.

Hopefully by the time he exits the 7.5 course and enters the 8.5 course he is traveling with some speed. The skater then must "switch gears" to adjust to the new spacing.

Again the skater keeps moving up the hill and entering with more speed until he can do the 7.5 and 8.5 foot courses clean and fast. (At first it may take 4-5 cones in the 8.5 foot course before he gets adjusted- and later his adjustment is automatic)


Then the skater moves up the hill to the 6.5 foot on center course. Again a short start with only 3 pushes. The skater learns acelleration and must make two "Shifts" to the newer spacings.

The next session involved a intermediate tech tight course and he did well!

So what is so great about this drill?

1. The skater always has success throughout the drill. Hits few cones so resetting is not a hassle.
2. The skater determines when he is ready to move up the hill.
3. With multiple skaters you make a rule that 3 hit cones and you have to exit- to keep them clean. With skaters perhaps each focusing on different sections- you'll have nearly instant course resets.
4. Skaters learn to experiment with different stance and pumping techniques, turn shape etc. to make the course fast.
5. Most importantly, each drill is brief and not fatigueing for the novice. 12 cones is easy for anyone. 24 is a little harder and 36 is not much of a problem because once you are up that high on the hill you aren't pumping as much into the last 12 8.5 foot gates.
6. You learn step overs and rhythm breaks without even thinking.
7. It can be done in limited width- a single lane is fine.
8. You learn a strong pump at any speed though most cone spacings.
9. You learn to process many cones per second.
10. You can add 3 GS gates in between each line to add difficulty and teach skaters to recover their speed after a few speed scrubbing offsets.
11. Chance of falling is almost nil.
12. You'll look good enough in about 10-15 runs that any spectator would be impressed.
13. Course resetting is simple enough so cones get put back on the circles by spectators as opposed to being randomly placed anywhere as with offset courses.
14. You learn to "enter a course" 3 times per run and pick up course spacing when you get to the top.
15. One course can handle a wide range of ability levels without getting boring for anyone.
One good turn deserves another
john gilmour

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Post by Wesley Tucker » Mon Aug 30, 2004 4:44 pm

John does it completely backards from the way I instruct someone to learn to slalom. He goes from big spacing to tighter. I tell someone who wants to slalom to start with FOUR FOOT spacing.

Yes, it's impossible. You knock down ALL the cones. But you keep at it. Eventually, you'll actually wiggle through a couple. Then maybe three. Before you know it, instead of 20 cones scattered everywhere you look back and see six maybe seven still standing.

At the point that frustration finally makes you say "to hell with it," reset the course to 6-foot spacing. It'll feel like the cones are three blocks apart! The newbie will SAIL though the cones like a pro. Afterwards, all that's left to do is increase speed and accuracy. This, of course, takes anywhere from a year to a lifetime, depending on driving habits.

Then, start all over again with the four foot cones OFFSET a few inches. Repeat tortuous routine. Go to 6-foot offsets. You might knock over a couple more than when they're straight, but don't we all?

Oh, it's important, though, when doing this type of learning technique to BE A COACH to the newbies. The frustration level of setting up cones after every run gets to be monotonous and discouraging. BUT, the results will satisfy anyone who wants to become a slalom skater IN A HURRY. Like, there's a race next weekend in a town just a few miles away and the newbie desperately wants to give the organizers his registration fee for a chance to get eliminated early in qualifying.

Ain't that what it's all about?

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next

Post by John Gilmour » Mon Aug 30, 2004 6:05 pm

If you are practicing alone- the 4 foot spacing thing is pretty torturous. That's a lot of back strain picking up those cones. Wesley :) But I'm sure that type of practice will also get results.

Problem is- all it takes is one cone splatterer and the practice session can grind to a halt- and even if that one guy is willing to pick them up- everyone has to wait for it.

You can also reverse my drill- by making the cones get tighter as you go down the hill- but that leads to lots of cone scatter and people in the course don't want to leave once they are in it- even if they knock them all over. Mostly because you are guaranteed to put a skater in oer his head- and things only get worse as the speed increases. With teh wider gates-0 the skater guages his speed to what he can do- and increases his speed as his accuracy allows.

Wesley does have a point with tight spacing though.

I learned to slalom with a set up that could turn ridiculously tight. it made learning to pump easy on flat land. I had a 24 inch deck with a kicktail about 5 inches wide- California slalom trucks, and road rider 2's. It could make very tight gates.

I ended up practicing sub 6 foot gates- I doubt tighter than 5' 8" gates on a 24 inch fiberflex kicktail with Bennett Hijackers and Road rider 4's. Short course perhaps only 15 gates long- and that was when I was 10 years old or so. It was as long as I could set a slalom course before going under an awning of a building.

Later I rode a Henry Hester Fibreflex with Bennett Pro Ad-tracs- ( I was under 80lbs too light to turn Tracker Full tracks) Rad Pads and OJ Superjuice wheels. I found that board liked wider gates so I started slaloming in Central Park instead.

I could have taken my 24 inch deck back to do the wider spacing...but why do that if longer wheelbases are faster? (Sometimes longwheels bases are not faster- if "agility" is the limiting factor as opposed to "searching for roll" in a course).

No matter what a strong pump in a variety of cone spacings is needed to be fast.

Next drill.

Set un-even but "regular " spacing in a course. So make every left turn a tighter gate (say less than 7 feet) and every right turn a wide gate (say wider than 8 feet). Then reverse it. Find out which is your weak side and work to improve it. Keep shrinking the tight gates and widening the wide gates. It will help learning how to pump "arhythmicly" .

After that try setting gates in groups of 5 and then moving hte line- it will teach you how to deal with strange offsets.

Lastly you can set a truly random course with all gate spacing irregular and all offsets irregular. While these courses typically are not the fastest courses- they will teach you how to deal with any gate.

Some Rhythm is needed in most courses to quickly generate speed for Novices and intermediate skaters. Even expert skaters appreciate some rhythm in their courses to get up to speed.
One good turn deserves another
john gilmour

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Post by Wesley Tucker » Mon Aug 30, 2004 8:12 pm

I've said this before, but I'll repeat it here. My suggested approach to slalom (ridiculously impossible tight leading to better control and speed in "normal" situations,) is a lot like being the batter's circle.

You would never take a 10-pound baseball bat up to the plate. But before every bat and during many hours of practice, batters swing a very heavy weighted bat. They do this over and over.

Then, they drop the weight and guess what? All of a sudden their 32-oz piece of Ash feels like a toothpick. It's the same sort of physical and mental preparation for slalom: take your practice to the furthest extreme you CAN'T handle. After all, it's practice. Practice on hills too steep. Run flat courses with as many dozens to hundreds of cones you can fit in the space. Practice til exhaustion. Work til you drop then work a little more.

Then, when competition rolls around, the actual race course, the hill, the length and the whole vibe will feel "simple." You'll find that you're as strong in the finals as you were in the first qualifying heat. You're almost disappointed that the course was so easy.

The only way to make easy courses is to make practice difficult, demanding and full of obstacles. Over coming those obstacles is what makes a winner. Side stepping the hard stuff just leaves you sitting on the sidewalk watching someone else run for first place.

No, I haven't overcome those obstacles. I know what it takes, but it just hasn't happened YET this time around for me in Slalom. But, I'm only 43. I got another good 20-25 years of racing in me. I'll only get faster :-)

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Post by John Gilmour » Mon Aug 30, 2004 8:20 pm

Wesley- what if you just tighten your trucks a little each time you ride? Does this work the same?
One good turn deserves another
john gilmour

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Post by Wesley Tucker » Mon Aug 30, 2004 9:06 pm

John Gilmour wrote:Wesley- what if you just tighten your trucks a little each time you ride? Does this work the same?
Tighter trucks (from my experience) make for a much stronger pump because they result in much stronger calves and thighs. As I observed somewher on this website after the 2002 Worlds, the real key to success in the modern slalom arena is STRENGTH. Notice who's winning: Mollica, Richy, Chicken, Fluitt. Fast guys with good technique and the STRENGTH of Clydesdales. It all adds up.

I don't see, though, where truck tension will improve your SLALOM RHYTHM. Getting a groove that works in tight, hybrid and giant slalom has to be FELT. And you find out what it feels like in practice. Anyone who has read my stuff over the years here and elsewhere knows how I equate slalom to music. It's all about rhythm, technique, strenth dexterity and mental preparedness. The same thing it takes to be a capable piano player. The only difference between Van Clyburn and a good slalom racer is Clyburn is a queer Texan. Not that Texas queers can't slalom, but I ain't seen one yet. (I said that that so Eddy and Marcus don't get a complex :-) ) (By the way, you troglodytes do know who Van Clyburn is, right?)

I would certainly suggest tightening your trucks, but then I would say you need to improve your leg strength to make the trucks turn when you want. The tighter the truck, the faster the pump speed. Squishy trucks ABSORB your pump speed and dissipate it. Tight trucks transmit your pump to the wheels and the asphalt and results in faster acceleration.

Anyway, I don't know that I can see where the truck tightening and loosening idea would work. I can, though, see where WHEEL NUT tightening would help. Tighten down the axle nuts, force your board through the cones, get pissed and frustrated at feeling like you're dragging cinder blocks through the cones, then loosen up the nuts: WHEEEE! You'll probably fall off from the acceleration curve.

Oh, use old bearings for this. No need to ruin your good ceramics in a practice session. Maybe use an old set of wheels too. Keeping the axle nuts screwed down can deform the seat and maybe damage the bearings. So if you use old trash, it won't matter. Hey, this is practice. Don't worry about. Just remember to put back on the good stuff before race day.

Wesley Tucker
1961-2013 (RIP)
1961-2013 (RIP)
Posts: 3279
Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2002 2:00 am

Post by Wesley Tucker » Wed Sep 01, 2004 9:27 pm

It took me 3 days, but I finally remembered what I've been trying to say with these posts. Skateboarding, like any other form of athleticism, will see a participant achieve the greatest success through RESISTANCE TRAINING.

Just like weight lifting, running, or football, if you train against resistance, you will develop stamina, strength, stronger metabolic functions and improved reflexes and reaction times.

Ever see a football player push the sled with the coach on board? That's resistance training. Weights are all about resistance and overcoming increasing levels of resistance. Runners train for long distance and sprints by adding weights to their legs and arms. All of these techniques RESIST the athlete who gets stronger and more capable by challenging and overcoming the resistance.

The same is true in skateboarding. If you introduce resistance to running cones (short spacing, wheel nut tightening, tighter trucks, flat slalom, UPHILL slalom, 100+-cone courses, etc.) you will improve your slalom skills as you become stronger and more skilled in overcoming the resistance you place against yourself.

Anyway, that sums up the "philosophy" about what I was trying to say in making training and practicing DIFFICULT. It's not a concept unique to skateboarding: it's almost universal in every athletic effort.

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